build muscle

Changing Habits to Maximize Performance

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When it comes to changing your body through diet and exercise it takes time and most people will run into setbacks that they never recover from. Often times these setbacks are something that could easily be avoided if they had changed their habits ahead of time.  You can’t always be all or nothing and still get results.  Shit happens and sometimes you have to do the best you can with the situation and move on.  I’ve talked to tons of people who do great for a week but then melt down for 2-3 days and eat like total crap because of lack of time and discipline.  This goes back to the fact that their HABITS never changed for the long term.  So, without further rambling here is a great article on effectively changing your habits from zenhabits.net.

The Habit Change Cheatsheet: 29 Ways to Successfully Ingrain a Behavior


Photo courtesy of Photocapy.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. – Aristotle

Our daily lives are often a series of habits played out through the day, a trammeled existence fettered by the slow accretion of our previous actions.
But habits can be changed, as difficult as that may seem sometimes.
I’m a living example: in tiny, almost infinitesimal steps, I’ve changed a laundry list of habits. Quit smoking, stopped impulse spending, got out of debt, began running and waking early and eating healthier and becoming frugal and simplifying my life and becoming organized and focused and productive, ran three marathons and a couple of triathlons, started a few successful blogs, eliminated my debt … you get the picture.
It’s possible.
And while I’ve written about habit change many times over the course of the life of Zen Habits, today I thought I’d put the best tips all together in one cheatsheet, for those new to the blog and for those who could use the reminders.
Keep it simple
Habit change is not that complicated. While the tips below will seem overwhelming, there’s really only a few things you need to know. Everything else is just helping these to become reality.
The simple steps of habit change:
1. Write down your plan.
2. Identify your triggers and replacement habits.
3. Focus on doing the replacement habits every single time the triggers happen, for about 30 days.
That’s it. We’ll talk more about each of these steps, and much more, in the cheatsheet below.


The Habit Change Cheatsheet
The following is a compilation of tips to help you change a habit. Don’t be overwhelmed — always remember the simple steps above. The rest are different ways to help you become more successful in your habit change.

1. Do just one habit at a time. Extremely important. Habit change is difficult, even with just one habit. If you do more than one habit at a time, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Keep it simple, allow yourself to focus, and give yourself the best chance for success. Btw, this is why New Year’s resolutions often fail — people try to tackle more than one change at a time.

2. Start small. The smaller the better, because habit change is difficult, and trying to take on too much is a recipe for disaster. Want to exercise? Start with just 5-10 minutes. Want to wake up earlier? Try just 10 minutes earlier for now. Or consider half habits.

3. Do a 30-day Challenge. In my experience, it takes about 30 days to change a habit, if you’re focused and consistent. This is a round number and will vary from person to person and habit to habit. Often you’ll read a magical “21 days” to change a habit, but this is a myth with no evidence. Seriously — try to find the evidence from a scientific study for this. A more recent study shows that 66 days is a better number (read more). But 30 days is a good number to get you started. Your challenge: stick with a habit every day for 30 days, and post your daily progress updates to a forum.

4. Write it down. Just saying you’re going to change the habit is not enough of a commitment. You need to actually write it down, on paper. Write what habit you’re going to change.

5. Make a plan. While you’re writing, also write down a plan. This will ensure you’re really prepared. The plan should include your reasons (motivations) for changing, obstacles, triggers, support buddies, and other ways you’re going to make this a success. More on each of these below.

6. Know your motivations, and be sure they’re strong. Write them down in your plan. You have to be very clear why you’re doing this, and the benefits of doing it need to be clear in your head. If you’re just doing it for vanity, while that can be a good motivator, it’s not usually enough. We need something stronger. For me, I quit smoking for my wife and kids. I made a promise to them. I knew if I didn’t smoke, not only would they be without a husband and father, but they’d be more likely to smoke themselves (my wife was a smoker and quit with me).

7. Don’t start right away. In your plan, write down a start date. Maybe a week or two from the date you start writing out the plan. When you start right away (like today), you are not giving the plan the seriousness it deserves. When you have a “Quit Date” or “Start Date”, it gives that date an air of significance. Tell everyone about your quit date (or start date). Put it up on your wall or computer desktop. Make this a Big Day. It builds up anticipation and excitement, and helps you to prepare.

8. Write down all your obstacles. If you’ve tried this habit change before (odds are you have), you’ve likely failed. Reflect on those failures, and figure out what stopped you from succeeding. Write down every obstacle that’s happened to you, and others that are likely to happen. Then write down how you plan to overcome them. That’s the key: write down your solution before the obstacles arrive, so you’re prepared.

9. Identify your triggers. What situations trigger your current habit? For the smoking habit, for example, triggers might include waking in the morning, having coffee, drinking alcohol, stressful meetings, going out with friends, driving, etc. Most habits have multiple triggers. Identify all of them and write them in your plan.

10. For every single trigger, identify a positive habit you’re going to do instead. When you first wake in the morning, instead of smoking, what will you do? What about when you get stressed? When you go out with friends? Some positive habits could include: exercise, meditation, deep breathing, organizing, decluttering, and more.

“Habit is habit, and not to be flung out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs a step at a time.” – Mark Twain

11. Plan a support system. Who will you turn to when you have a strong urge? Write these people into your plan. Support forums online are a great tool as well — I used a smoking cessation forum on about.com when I quit smoking, and it really helped. Don’t underestimate the power of support — it’s really important.

12. Ask for help. Get your family and friends and co-workers to support you. Ask them for their help, and let them know how important this is. Find an AA group in your area. Join online forums where people are trying to quit. When you have really strong urges or a really difficult time, call on your support network for help. Don’t smoke a cigarette, for example, without posting to your online quit forum. Don’t have a drop of alcohol before calling your AA buddy.

13. Become aware of self-talk. You talk to yourself, in your head, all the time — but often we’re not aware of these thoughts. Start listening. These thoughts can derail any habit change, any goal. Often they’re negative: “I can’t do this. This is too difficult. Why am I putting myself through this? How bad is this for me anyway? I’m not strong enough. I don’t have enough discipline. I suck.” It’s important to know you’re doing this.

14. Stay positive. You will have negative thoughts — the important thing is to realize when you’re having them, and push them out of your head. Squash them like a bug! Then replace them with a positive thought. “I can do this! If Leo can do it, so can I!” 🙂

15. Have strategies to defeat the urge. Urges are going to come — they’re inevitable, and they’re strong. But they’re also temporary, and beatable. Urges usually last about a minute or two, and they come in waves of varying strength. You just need to ride out the wave, and the urge will go away. Some strategies for making it through the urge: deep breathing, self-massage, eat some frozen grapes, take a walk, exercise, drink a glass of water, call a support buddy, post on a support forum.

16. Prepare for the sabotagers. There will always be people who are negative, who try to get you to do your old habit. Be ready for them. Confront them, and be direct: you don’t need them to try to sabotage you, you need their support, and if they can’t support you then you don’t want to be around them.

17. Talk to yourself. Be your own cheerleader, give yourself pep talks, repeat your mantra (below), and don’t be afraid to seem crazy to others. We’ll see who’s crazy when you’ve changed your habit and they’re still lazy, unhealthy slobs!

18. Have a mantra. For quitting smoking, mine was “Not One Puff Ever” (I didn’t make this up, but it worked — more on this below). When I wanted to quit my day job, it was “Liberate Yourself”. This is just a way to remind yourself of what you’re trying to do.

19. Use visualization. This is powerful. Vividly picture, in your head, successfully changing your habit. Visualize doing your new habit after each trigger, overcoming urges, and what it will look like when you’re done. This seems new-agey, but it really works.

20. Have rewards. Regular ones. You might see these as bribes, but actually they’re just positive feedback. Put these into your plan, along with the milestones at which you’ll receive them.
21. Take it one urge at a time. Often we’re told to take it one day at a time — which is good advice — but really it’s one urge at a time. Just make it through this urge.

22. Not One Puff Ever (in other words, no exceptions). This seems harsh, but it’s a necessity: when you’re trying to break the bonds between an old habit and a trigger, and form a new bond between the trigger and a new habit, you need to be really consistent. You can’t do it sometimes, or there will be no new bond, or at least it will take a really really long time to form. So, at least for the first 30 days (and preferably 60), you need to have no exceptions. Each time a trigger happens, you need to do the new habit and not the old one. No exceptions, or you’ll have a backslide. If you do mess up, regroup, learn from your mistake, plan for your success, and try again (see the last item on this list).

23. Get rest. Being tired leaves us vulnerable to relapse. Get a lot of rest so you can have the energy to overcome urges.

24. Drink lots of water. Similar to the item above, being dehydrated leaves us open to failure. Stay hydrated!

26. Set up public accountability. Blog about it, post on a forum, email your commitment and daily progress to friend and family, post a chart up at your office, write a column for your local newspaper (I did this when I ran my first marathon). When we make it public — not just the commitment but the progress updates — we don’t want to fail.

27. Engineer it so it’s hard to fail. Create a groove that’s harder to get out of than to stay in: increase positive feedback for sticking with the habit, and increase negative feedback for not doing the habit. Read more on this method.

28. Avoid some situations where you normally do your old habit, at least for awhile, to make it a bit easier on yourself. If you normally drink when you go out with friends, consider not going out for a little while. If you normally go outside your office with co-workers to smoke, avoid going out with them. This applies to any bad habit — whether it be eating junk food or doing drugs, there are some situations you can avoid that are especially difficult for someone trying to change a bad habit. Realize, though, that when you go back to those situations, you will still get the old urges, and when that happens you should be prepared.

29. If you fail, figure out what went wrong, plan for it, and try again. Don’t let failure and guilt stop you. They’re just obstacles, but they can be overcome. In fact, if you learn from each failure, they become stepping stones to your success. Regroup. Let go of guilt. Learn. Plan. And get back on that horse.

Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones. – Benjamin Franklin

3 Kings Part 2: The Squat

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Back in Part 1 I started talking about the 3-4 most efficient exercises you can do in the gym no matter if you are trying to be a better athlete, build some muscle or drop some fat.

In part two here I’m going over what could arguably me moved to #1 if I wanted: The Barbell Squat.  Hands down this is one of the most productive exercises that can be done in the gym.  It builds leg strength, abdominal stability, upper back strength, mental toughness, and mental focus all in 1 exercise.  Most will skip this exercise in favor of some sort of crappy machine like the leg press, leg extension/curl, or the hack squat.  While you can build some leg size on those machines (primarily the leg press/hack squat, stay as far from the leg extension/curl machines as possible) it’s going to take more time and it’s far less badass.  If I’m going to be lifting I’m picking the most potent exercises I can to reach whatever goal I have the quickest.  No matter what goal I’ve had, barbell squats have been a part of it.

http://www.youtube.com/v/zYWaFqQaXGc?fs=1&hl=en_US

In that video you see me box squatting to a parallel box as well as to a box what was well below parallel.  One of the reasons I really prefer the box squat over a regular squat is because it forces you to hit the right depth on every single rep and it places the work primarily on the hamstrings and glutes which is where it needs to be.  You can also limit the hamstring involvement by using a narrower stance.  Either way though the squat builds muscle and strength in at speeds that a machine could only dream of.  You don’t have to just back squat either, you can do a front squat or a zercher squat like you’ll see in the next couple videos.

http://www.youtube.com/v/hv1byrccCeY?fs=1&hl=en_US

http://www.youtube.com/v/g_4trHTIWEc?fs=1&hl=en_US

Get under the bar and get to work!

How To Structure A Kettlebell Workout For Size and Strength

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How To Structure A Kettlebell Workout For Size and Strength

By Mike Mahler
Mike Mahler

I get tons of emails from kettlebell trainees on how to structure kettlebell workouts for getting bigger and stronger. Many trainees make the mistake of doing too many exercises; apply improper use of volume; and use flawed training frequency. Training frustration is soon to follow with the inevitable lack of progress from not having a clear target. When designing a program, you must consider that you can only be good at so many things. Thus, one of the keys to designing an effective program for strength and size is to keep things simple and focus on doing a few things well. Moreover, you balanced development is critical as is proper exercise selection. Lets get into some key ingredients for maximizing a kettlebell program for size and strength.
The first thing you need to do is focus on are exercises that provide the most bang for you buck. I like to break down a full body workout into five categories. Pick one pressing exercise, one pulling exercise, one exercise for the quads, one for the hamstrings, and one core exercise. This ensures that the entire body is getting a workout and prevents trainees from focusing too much on one area. For example, men like to focus on the upper body and women like to focus on the lower body. To avoid imbalances and being mistaken for a California bodybuilder, focus on working the entire body and pick one exercise per category. Lets discuss each category:

Pressing

A pressing exercise will take care of the shoulders, triceps, and depending on what you pick the chest as well. Here are some kettlebell pressing exercises to choose from:

  • The Double Clean and Military Press (clean before each press)
  • Double Military Press
  • Double Sots Press
  • Alternating Military Press
  • Floor Press
  • Alternating Floor Press

Pulling

Pulling exercises are a necessity to ensure balanced development for the upper body. Moreover there is a synergy between pulling and pressing muscles. The better you get at pulling, the stronger your pressing will be and vice versa. Here are some excellent pulling exercises for you to choose from:

  • Pull-ups with a kettlebell attached (use a dipping belt)
  • Renegade Row
  • Double Bent Over Row
  • Alternating Bent-over Row
  • One-arm Rows with two kettlebells (see Pavel’s “More Russian Kettlebell Challenges DVD)

Quads

To avoid looking like a California bodybuilder you need to work on the legs. Even if you do not care about leg development, if you care about upper body development you need a strong foundation. I have had online clients that blast through pressing plateaus by increasing leg strength. You body is only as strong as you weakest link. Build a strong foundation with the following exercises:

  • Double Front Squat
  • Double Lunge
  • Suitcase Squat
  • Double Front Box Squat

Hamstrings

The next critical area is the back of your legs. You need to balance the quad development from the squats with some hamstring exercises. In addition, if you are an athlete, you need strong hamstrings for explosive strength and speed. Choose from the following:

  • Double Swing
  • Double Clean
  • Double Snatch
  • Full Body Attack (on my new DVD, The Kettlebell Solution For Speed and Explosive Strength)
  • Double One Legged Squat

Core

The last important area to cover is the midsection. The midsection is the hook that connects the lower body to the upper body and if your core is weak so is your entire body and you will not be as strong as you could be with a well-developed powerful midsection. Choose from the following list:

  • Double Windmill
  • One-arm Windmill
  • Turkish Get-up
  • Turkish Get-up Sit-up

Now that we have all of the bases covered. Lets go over program design options. If your main goal is to get bigger and stronger then split your workouts into upper body and lower body and workout each area two times per week. Here is a sample program:

Monday: (Upper Body Focus)

  • A-1: Double Clean and Press 5×5
  • A-2: Double Bent Over Row 5×5

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 5×5 on both exercises. When you can do 5×5, add another set and do 6×5. Your long-term goal is to do 10×5

Tuesday (Lower Body Focus)

  • A-1: Double Front Squat 5×5
  • A-2: Double Swing 5×5

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 5×5 on both exercises. When you can do 5×5, add another set and do 6×5. Your long-term goal is to do 10×5
Take a one-minute break and then do:

  • Turkish Get-up 2×5 l,r (left and right with one-minute breaks)

Thursday: (Upper Body Focus)

  • A-1: Double Floor Press 5×5
  • A-2: Pull-up with a kettlebell 5×5

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 5×5 on both exercises. When you can do 5×5, add another set and do 6×5. Your long-term goal is to do 10×5

Friday (Lower Body Focus)

  • A-1: Double Front Lunge 5×5 each leg
  • A-2: Double Snatch 5×5

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 5×5 on both exercises. When you can do 5×5, add another set and do 6×5. Your long-term goal is to do 10×5
Take a one-minute break and then do:

  • Double Windmill 2×5 l,r (left and right with one-minute breaks)

Now if you are under some time constraints and only have time for two workouts per week then try doing two full body workouts per week. This is also a great program for people that require more rest days for adequate recovery. Here is a sample program:

Monday

  • A-1: Double Floor Press 3×5
  • A-2: Pull-up with a kettlebell 3×5

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 3×5 on both exercises. Your long-term goal is to work up to 6×5 per exercise.
Take a one-minute break and then move on to:

  • B-1: Double Front Squat 3×6
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×6

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 3×6 on both exercises. When you can do 3×6, add another set and do 4×6. Your long-term goal is to do 6×6 per exercise.
Take a one-minute break and then do:

  • Double Windmill 2×5 l,r (left and right with one-minute breaks)

Thursday

  • A-1: Double Clean and Military Press 3×5
  • A-2: Renegade Row 3×5 l,r (left and right)

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 3×5 on both exercises. Your long-term goal is to work up to 6×5 per exercise.
Take a one-minute break and then move on to:

  • B-1: Double Front Lunge 3×6
  • B-2: Double Snatch 3×6

Do A-1 and A-2 back to back. In other words, do a set of A-1, wait a minute and then do a set of A-2, wait a minute and so forth. Continue in this fashion until you have completed 3×6 on both exercises. When you can do 3×6, add another set and do 4×6. Your long-term goal is to do 6×6 per exercise
Take a one-minute break and then do:

  • Turkish Get-up 2×5 l,r (left and right with one-minute breaks)

To summarize, the keys to building an effective kettlebell program for size and strength is to focus on compound exercises and balanced development. Make sure to cover the five major categories for balanced development and organize a program in such a way that all of the bases are covered with the appropriate amount of training days, volume, and intensity.

Underground Bodybuilding…

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Power-Building for Strength and Mass

Bill Pearl was a bodybuilder back during the 50’s – through the early 70’s. The man was built like a tank and ripped. Not only did he look strong, he was strong!

Bill’s training program was a heavy volume workout with lots of exercises, lots of sets and a wide variety of rep ranges. You would find barbells, dumbbells, machines, cables, bodyweight and more in his programs.

Bill NEVER trained to failure, he was smart, and always left a rep or two in the tank and left the gym feeling like he had a great workout, but not a workout that left him spent all day.

 

Check out some of Bill’s bodybuilding exercises below to develop the shoulders, biceps and triceps.


Bodybuilding is great, but, if you want to incorporate Power-Building, where you mix movements like those you see above with some strongman type work you will no doubt develop a physique that is ALL Show and ALL Go!
 

The Soul Lifter

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This is an article written by Zach Even-Esh about going back to the roots of why you loved lifting and forgetting all the “rules” that are holding you back.

The Soul Lifter, Part I

By Zach Even – Esh
 

Lifting can be very scientific, especially when training athletes.

But, what if you’re not an athlete?

Heck, even if you are an athlete, you DON”T have to follow the rules all the time!
 

Log Throwing
Above, Log Throwing. Who ever said this would get you strong? Sometimes you gotta go AGAINST the grain!


What if you just wanna hit the trails running, doing sporadic things as you run: stone carries, pull ups on tree branches, stone throwing, walking lunges, bear crawls through trails….

Sometimes you gotta ditch the rules, ditch the science and follow your soul, your heart….

What do you FEEL like doing today when you “train”?

You may not know the answer to that question, so the best thing to do is to get going. Get outside….hit the trails….your backyard maybe….the local park and playground….or, load up your car with a kettlebell or two, a sandbag and maybe some thick rope.

Above, Getting’ CRAZY throwing stones & Kettlebells!

Who knows what you might come up with.

I suggest at least once a week, you just gather up all your training equipment that you have at home and put together a workout where you perform at least 1 movement for 5 – 20 reps with each training tool you have.

For Example:

Dumbbell: Snatch + Press Combo
Barbell: Clean & Press + Throw & Repeat
Car / Truck: Push for 200’
Car / Truck: Attach 60’ rope and pull hand over hand
Small Tire: Throw for Distance
Hills: Sprint Up / Bear Crawl Down
Kettlebell: Snatch Throw

If you REALLY wanna start breaking the rules, then you owe it to yourself to get The Underground Strength System HERE.

If you want more Underground Strength Training Secrets, check out The Underground Strength System where I reveal the most powerful muscle building, fat burning, strength & conditioning information you will ever feast your eyes on! 
Check it out HERE.

Mahlers High Frequency Training for Fat Loss

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This article was written by Mike Mahler on his website (www.mikemahler.com) and it goes into detail about a different way to lose fat.  While most programs have you add in more and more cardio, this one focuses on adding strength workouts as you advance. 

High Frequency Training For Fat Loss 

By Mike Mahler 
HFT is my favorite style of training for strength, muscle building, and fat loss. No need to add any cardio at all to the program. Focus on doing the strength training workouts well and you will be all set. Do not add more training to the mix. More cardio will not make the program work better and will screw up you’re hormone levels.
Start with four workouts per week as indicated in the beginner program. After a month, go to the intermediate program and train five times per week. Finally, in month three go to the advanced program and train six times per week.
Whenever, you are stressed or need more days off, go back down to four days per week. You can even mix and match the training. One week, workout four times per week and another week workout five times etc.
Every time you work out and avoid over training you get a GH surge and an increase in Testosterone. Thus it is important to workout as frequently as possible to maximize fat loss and muscle building. If you feel like having sex after a workout, you are doing great. If you are wiped out and beat up, you are working too hard and need to scale back. Reduce the sets to 1-2 for a while if necessary. Make sure you sleep well every night and have a solid diet and supplement plan.

Beginner Option 1:

Monday and Thursday

  • A-1: Double KB Clean and Press 3×6
  • A-2: Double Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Double Suitcase Kickstand Lunge 3×8 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×8 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises.
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Slow and controlled Sit-up 3×10 (4 seconds up and down)

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.
Tuesday and Friday

  • A-1: Double Hang Clean and Military Press 3×6
  • A-2: Alternating KB Renegade Row 3×6 each side

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Suitcase KB Squat 3×10
  • B-2: Double KB Clean 3×10 

Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • C-1: Side Bend 3×8 l,r (left and right) 
  • C-2: Double Overhead Walk 3 rounds  

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.
Wednesday-Saturday-Sunday
1-2 mile walks

Intermediate (5 days per week)

Monday

  • A-1: Double KB Clean and Press 3×6
  • A-2: Double Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6
Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises.
  • B-1: Double Suitcase Kickstand Lunge 3×8 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×8 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Slow and controlled Sit-up 3×10 (4 seconds up and down)

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.
Tuesday

  • A-1: Double Hang Clean and Military Press 3×6
  • A-2: Alternating KB Renegade Row 3×6 each side

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Suitcase KB Squat 3×10
  • B-2: Double KB Clean 3×10 

Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • C-1: Side Bend 3×8 l,r (left and right) 
  • C-2: Double Overhead Walk 3 rounds  

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.
Wednesday

  • A-1: Hand To Hand Clean and Press 3×6 l,r
  • A-2: One-arm Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6 l,r
Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • B-1: Double Rack Kickstand Lunge 3×6 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×6 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Slow and controlled Sit-up 3×10 (4 seconds up and down)

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.
Thursday

  • A-1: Relaxed Military Press 3×6
  • A-2: Alternating Bent-over Row 3×6 each side

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • Double Clean and Front Squat 3×8 (one-minute breaks in between each set)
  • Finisher: Hindu Squat 50 reps
Friday
  • A-1: Double KB Clean and Press 3×6
  • A-2: Double Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Double Suitcase Kickstand Lunge 3×8 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×8 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Double Overhead Walk 3 rounds  

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.

Advanced (6 days per week)

Monday

  • A-1: Double KB Clean and Press 3×6
  • A-2: Double Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6
Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • B-1: Suitcase Squat 3×12 
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×12 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×15 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Double Overhead Walk 3 rounds  

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.

  • Finisher: 50 Pushups

Tuesday

  • A-1: Double Hang Clean and Military Press 3×6
  • A-2: Alternating KB Renegade Row 3×6 each side

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Clean and Squat 3×6
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×6 

Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • C-1: Side Bend 3×8 l,r (left and right) 
  • C-2: Double Overhead Walk 3 rounds  

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.

  • Finisher: Hindu Squat 50 Reps

Wednesday

  • A-1: Hand To Hand Clean and Press 3×6 l,r
  • A-2: One-arm Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6 l,r
Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • B-1: Double Rack Kickstand Lunge 3×6 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×6 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Slow and controlled Sit-up 3×10 (4 seconds up and down)

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.

  • Finisher: Jumper Squat 50 reps

Thursday

  • A-1: Double Clean and Alternating Press 3×7 each side 
  • A-2: Alternating Renegade Row 3×8 each side 

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • B-1: Double Suitcase Squat 3×15 
  • B-2: Hand To Hand KB Swing 3×15 each side  

Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×20 on both exercises
Friday

  • A-1: Relaxed Military Press 3×8
  • A-2: Alternating Bent-over Row 3×8 each side

Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises

  • Double Clean and Front Squat 3×8 (one-minute breaks in between each set)
  • Finisher: Hindu Squat 50 reps
Saturday
  • A-1: Double KB Clean and Press 3×6
  • A-2: Double Ballistic KB Bent-over Row 3×6
Do A-1 and A-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of A-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of A-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • B-1: Double Suitcase Kickstand Lunge 3×8 l,r
  • B-2: Double Swing 3×8 
Do B-1 and B-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of B-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of B-2. Long-term goal is to work up to 3×12 on both exercises
  • C-1: Power Wheel Roll Out 3×6
  • C-2: Slow and controlled Sit-up 3×10 (4 seconds up and down)

Do C-1 and C-2 in antagonistic fashion. One set of C-1, then a one-minute break and then a set of C-2.

  • Finisher: Jumper Squats 50 reps

Upper Push/Pull and Battle Ropes

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1a) 1 Arm DB Press x 8, 8, 8
1b) Weighted Pull Up x 5, 5, 5
3 minutes between rounds

2a) Feet Elevated Push Up x AMAP2b) Inverted Row x AMAP
3b) Knees to Bows x AMAP
3 rounds, 1 minute between rounds

Garden Hose Battle Rope-
Alt Waves x 20 seconds
Circular Waves x 20 seconds
Vertical Waves x 20 seconds
2 rounds, 2 minutes between rounds

Go heavy and hard on the first two exercise.  Like I said in my last post, a garden hose works pretty well as and actual battle rope substitution.  I’m still working on getting a fire hose to use but for now it’s great.  When it starts to get easier I’ll increase my total time.

Cavo Profundus

Tire Flipping and a Battle Rope Alternative

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Song of the Day: Fall by Sevendust
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g62lihLKdG8

 It was leg day again but since I’m still a little sore from the KB swings Monday I thought I’d take it a little easier today.

Tire Flip- 5
Tire Flip + 30# bag- 5, 2, 2

Broad Jump x 2 + 20 yd sprint- 3 sets

Garden Hose Battle Rope x a bunch

I didn’t do any particular sets and reps on the battle ropes.  I just went balls out for a couple minutes and I was ready to puke.  Since the garden hose isn’t that heavy per foot, you need a considerable length of it.  The one I was using was about 12 yards long on each side.  It’s not pretty, but it works!

Cavo Profundus

Kettlebells for Cardio

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After reading a post on Alwyn Cosgroves website about the metabolic effect of high rep kettlebell swings I decided to give it a shot.

http://alwyncosgrove.com/2010/04/kettlebells-for-cardio/

I borrowed two 20# KB’s from a friend and got to work.  I did a bunch of pressing, rowing, snatching, cleaning, and juggling with them as a warm up and just to get the feel for them.

The results- 235 KB swings in 12 minutes.

I was shooting for 300 but I severely underestimated the difficulty of performing that many reps.  I’ll try it again in a week or two and see if I can improve on that number.

Yesterdays Training

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Suspended Dips-
BW x 3 x 5 reps

Suspended Flys-
BW x 3 x 6 reps

Suspended Fat Grip Inverted Rows-
BW x 3 x 10 reps

Tire 1/2 Flip ss. Jump Rope
5 flips – 100 skips
5 flips – 100 skips

I made my own blast straps/TRX yesterday so I decided to play with it since once again I had no access to a gym. The tire 1/2 flip was done with the tire laying a foot or two from a brick wall. What I did was try to take it in one smooth motion from the ground up to my shoulders and then threw it as hard as I could into the wall.

Later that evening I had my training class over in the park so I jumped in with them for some conditioning.

Overhead Iso Drag x 40 yards
Hand Over Hand Sled Drag x 20 yards
Backwards Sled Drag x 20 yards
10 Table Jumps
Table Push x 40 yards (20 high/20 low)
(Two rounds total)

Finished off with 2 rounds of flying sledge wings. Basically one person pulls the sled one big jerk at a time and the other has to do a broad jump after it and hit it each time it stops. I’ll get a video of it next time.